Osprey Atmos 50 Review (2022)

January 27, 2022

By Nate

Comments

Are you looking to reduce your load and seeking an osprey atmos 50 review? If you’re wanting to reduce your pack weight so that you can enjoy the journey more, or if you just want to carry a few more pleasures, then this may be a pack worth considering.

Pros:

  • A gimmick, to be sure, but the Anti-Gravity mechanism is not.
  • It truly does seem like the pack is floating on your back when you’re wearing it.
  • The ventilation is excellent.
  • It’s jam-packed with well-considered features.
  • Excellent for usage in all four seasons.
  • The fit is fully customizable.

Cons:

  • Carrying excessively big loads is not something I am good at.
  • It’s a touch on the heavier side, to be honest.
  • There are far too many zippers and straps on this bag.
  • Attaching large equipment to the exterior of a vehicle is tricky.

Design & Durability

Overall, the Atmos backpack is a traditional-style hiking pack with a ton of features that are all incorporated in a very useful and light-weight design. We definitely did not want to write our osprey atmos 50 review without bringing up design and durability.

The lightweight suspension system and lighter materials used in the Atmos provide in significant weight reductions when compared to the heavier materials used in the Osprey pack series, such as the Aether model, in which the Atmos is designed to compete.

The Atmos is a mid-weight pack that falls roughly in the centre of the Osprey pack line in terms of weight, and it is primarily targeted at those who want a pack that is suited for three to five-day journeys with a load of 12-18kgs in weight. If you were closer to the 18 kg mark, though, you could find it more comfortable to transport your belongings in something a little heavier, such as the Aether model described above.

Learn More About the Osprey Back Pack on Amazon

Suspension

The suspension, which is appropriately termed ‘Anti gravity,’ is made up of two light but robust rods that are integrated into the pack frame, as well as a complete mesh back. When you start working, the mesh allows you to breathe much more easily than you would with a pack that simply rests the body against your back.

There are several characteristics on the Atmos. Starting at the top of the bag, the top pocket is detachable and may be utilized as a tiny daypack when not in use. If you remove the lid and use it on its own, it includes a built-in strap that allows you to carry it around your waist. The pack also features an integrated ‘flap jacket’ cover that allows you to seal off the main compartment when the lid is removed and used alone.

Internal Features

In terms of internal features, the Atmos boasts a top to bottom hydration pocket that can accommodate a 3-litre water bladder while keeping the weight where you want it on your back.

In addition, there is a bottom compartment with a zippered sleeping bag compartment and a detachable internal divider that can be reached from the outside of the pack. When the internal divider is in place, it effectively divides the main pack into two halves, with the bottom part accessible through the exterior zipped-up area at the bottom of the bag.

The Atmos boasts a plethora of compression straps on the sides, top, and front of the pack, as well as removable external sleeping pad straps on the front and bottom of the pack. It also contains two huge zip-up hip strap pockets, one on each waist strap, as well as two large zip-up hip strap pockets.

Externally, there is a big elastic strip that extends from just below the lid to just above the zipped sleeping bag access part on the front of the backpack.

All of these characteristics work together to make the Atmos a true delight to carry and use.

Ease of Use

I was eager to experiment with a lighter pack that would be more in keeping with the smaller weight I was now bringing on most of my travels. It’s 15 liters smaller than the 65 liter Aether, but my gear has shrunk significantly as a result of my efforts to reduce weight, so the loss in capacity isn’t an issue for any except the longest journeys.

My Osprey packs’ bottom exterior zipped area comes in handy a lot when I’m hiking since it keeps my belongings safe and secure. I pack my blanket, mat, headlamp, and thermals in a small dry sack at the bottom of the pack, and then use a smaller dry bag on top of the pack in the main portion to store the rest of my stuff.

My shelter will then be placed in one of the side pockets or on top of the dry bag, right below the top lid, depending on the situation. This is convenient for me since it eliminates the need for me to unpack my full backpack at each campsite in order to put up my bedding and shelter. Some people like to put everything in a single dry bag in the main compartment, but I find that this function works well for me.

Ease of us is most certainly a perk when discussing the backpack in this osprey atmos 50 review.

Hydration Holder and Side Pockets.

The hydration holder is excellent because it allows you to slip the bladder down the rear of the pack and clip it in place, which keeps the weight of the water low and pressed up against the back of the pack for maximum comfort.

The hose also feeds out to the sternum straps through a hose connection, making it simple to obtain your water while on the move. I’ve found that this makes it easier to remain hydrated when on the move.

I use a top-opening bladder for a variety of reasons, including the fact that they are easier to clean and dry, as well as the fact that you don’t have to remove it once you’re inside the pack. It is possible to simply open the top and fill it up in position while still keeping it within the hydration holder in the pack when the water source is high enough.

When you’re on the go, the twin zip-up hip pockets are convenient since they are quick to reach. On one side, they’re large enough to hold the necessities, such as a Cliff Bar and some lip balm or sunscreen, and on the other, a phone or a tiny camera.

The side pockets are large enough to comfortably fit a water bottle of reasonable size on both sides of the bag. I can easily fit a 1.5-litre bottle of water in each of them. The side pockets are particularly useful since they provide two points of access into the pocket. Two different entrances are available: one is the usual top entry and the other is a side access.

Anti-Gravity Suspension

The ‘Anti-gravity’ suspension is essentially a continuous length of mesh that goes behind the top of the shoulder straps and all the way down to the waist straps, where it connects with them. On the trail, it’s tough but elastic, and it does a nice job of ventilating your back when you’re out in the elements. The suspension, as well as the waist straps, are fully adjustable, as is the case with most high-quality packs. In addition, the pack incorporates an adjustable sternum strap with a safety whistle incorporated into the clip.

Rain Jacket

A rain jacket and a rain cover may be stored in the top lid’s two exterior pockets, with the top pocket being the smaller of the two. Additionally, if you’re concerned about losing something important, like as your keys, when you unzip the top pocket, there’s a little clip within the pocket. With its larger bottom pocket on the lid, it can accommodate maps, snacks, a jacket and first aid kit as well as a lunch. It’s convenient for carrying items you’ll need during the day and prevents you from repeatedly opening and unloading your bag throughout the day.

Removing the top lid is straightforward; it only takes a few of clips, and you’ll be able to go away from camp or your pack while still being able to carry some basics. The ‘flap jacket’ also closes over the top of the pack with a couple of clips, ensuring that your main pack isn’t exposed to the elements while on the trail.

Conclusion

Overall, the Atmos is a pretty great pack with characteristics that are comparable to those found in my Aether model. The primary differences between the two packs are the weight of the pack and the ‘toughness’ of the materials used in its construction.

While the Atmos will take a little more attention, as with anything that is lightweight, it should provide no problems for the wearer when used as intended. We hope this osprey atmos 50 review has been helpful.

Learn More About the Osprey Back Pack on Amazon

Related Posts

Sawyer Micro Squeeze | 2022 Review

Sawyer Micro Squeeze | 2022 Review

Are you seeking more information about the Sawyer micro squeeze water filtration system? If so, welcome to Trad Climbers. This hollow-fibre membrane water filter, which weighs less than 2 ounces (57 g), successfully removes bacteria and protozoa from drinking water...

Osprey Kestrel 48 | 2022 Review

Osprey Kestrel 48 | 2022 Review

The Osprey Kestrel 48 has proven itself over a long period of time. Hikers adore it, and reviewers adore it as well. The brand new edition is even better than the previous one. Short hikes with a tent are made possible with this backpack. Alternatively, for extended...

Best Backpacking Sleeping Bag under $100

Best Backpacking Sleeping Bag under $100

Are you seeking more information about what are the best backpacking sleeping bag under $100? If so, welcome to Trad Climbers. Staying warm while camping shouldn't be prohibitively expensive, so check out our selection of the best backpacking sleeping bags under $100...

0 Comments

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *